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gcapsuap

First time hunting tips for non-Norwegians

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Posted (edited)

Hei all,

I am 27M, non-Norwegian raised up in a country where hunting is super illegal activity let alone owning a gun. I moved to Norway for my post graduation studies and now doing my PhD, and aiming to stay in Norway in future. I always have been super intrigued by hunting(via TV, Youtube, MEATEATER, etc) and outdoor activities since i was a kid. I just passed jegerprøveeksamen and waiting for my weapons application to be approved.

 

So one could have guessed by now I am totally new to this, just knowing things from youtube but not practically. Unlike Norwegian kids I have not grown up in this culture and don't know shit about practical hunting stuff in woods. Of course with this jegerproven kurs I know about rules/regulations and since I have moved to Norway I have got a bit good in bush-crafting also.

With me being non-Norwegian I have some limitations regarding hunting like:

1. No access to hunting dogs, atleast for next few years.

2. Probably very difficult to get into a hunting party/hunting teams so going for big game might take time

3. I live in Hybel, no car. So how to move to and forth to hunting place might be challenge which I would figure out

4. And basically inexperience and no family support.

I plan to start with small game this year, have already bought a season pass for an area nearby (which was free for first timers, luck me) and will buy some more for far off lands. I will be doing some recon trips in the nearby land for which I got pass until the season starts, trying to learn to stalk up to animals with full camo gear, decide upon a good camping site and maybe talking to locals there. Being super nerdy, I have also started reading lot of hunting books(Steven Rinella's books).

 

So now my question/or topic of discussion for you guys is, how do I start my life long hunting expedition basically from scratch. Any kind of suggestions would be much appreciated.

Thanks a lot in advance

mvh,

Gaurav

Edited by gcapsuap

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No need for full camo for small game. Just walk quietly and slowly. And check out your local njff. They probably have some introductionhunts for you. :)

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Your local NJFF is probably the best advice you’ll get. They usually have a bunch of activities for beginners. Great way to learn about hunting and meeting others with the same interests. Good luck!

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Posted (edited)
7 timer siden, gcapsuap skrev:

Hei all,

 

1. No access to hunting dogs, atleast for next few years.

2. Probably very difficult to get into a hunting party/hunting teams so going for big game might take time

3. I live in Hybel, no car. So how to move to and forth to hunting place might be challenge which I would figure out

4. And basically inexperience and no family support.

I plan to start with small game this year, have already bought a season pass for an area nearby (which was free for first timers, luck me) and will buy some more for far off lands. I will be doing some recon trips in the nearby land for which I got pass until the season starts, trying to learn to stalk up to animals with full camo gear, decide upon a good camping site and maybe talking to locals there. Being super nerdy, I have also started reading lot of hunting books(Steven Rinella's books).

 

 

As already said, the local JFF is where to start. Where are you located Maybe someone can point you to someone or somewhere.

 

1. Dogs are not neccesary, and anything short of a very well trained dog, is usually more of nuisance, to anyone but the owner of the actual (always fantastic) animal. Dog are also the reason for at least half of all the "excuses" hunting stories... I have hunted, sometimes to good effect, for about 40 years - mostly without dogs, but have owned two, one fair, and one utterly useless.

 

2. Foreigner, into the most conservative community you can dream up in a nightmare. 70y olds denying everyone under 65 access on grounds of "lack of experience", (in reality keeping the good stuff to themselves) while complaining about lack of recruitment. And probably not "Blenda white" either - you'll be branded terrorist before you know ;)

More seriously, without knowing the landowners personally, this is virtually impossible for anyone, save, maybe a young and pretty woman - dressing sexy will help.., the alternative is just paying into something, but that can be very expensive.

You can apply for reindeer tags, that is solo big game hunting - and while very challenging, often more inspiring than moose or the various deer, since you can see animals for long distances.
 

3. No car is a challenge, find a friend with one, A scooter will work in a pinch,  buses usually dont go to good hunting grounds.

 

4. Camo is not necessary, and not what brings meat to the table, helps maybe on some game, but generally not, and the effect is doubtful on most norwegian game. However camouflaged, you will still smell, still make noise - og usually, animals that use sight as primary sense, will still see you. Covering face and hands sometimes help. Sitting still and beiing quiet, moving silently, and always upwind does work.
Hunting is more about beiing outdoors than about killing - so get used to beiing quiet, even when wet, cold, full of mosquitos, etc. Reading too much american stuff may not be helpful here. Having hunted both places, i know that our ways work over there, but certainly not all internet/Youtube, product selling american "tips and tricks" work here - and probably not there either.

 

Shooting and firearms. Get proper training - that is not usually a part of the "Jegerprøvekurs", first, safety training - beiing nerdy, you can read up on that, it will work. finger off the trigger when not aiming, point in safe direction always, treat gun as loaded always, never (NEVER EVER) point at anyone. That does it, and just follow those rules will do the trick.

Shooting and hitting something, again not a part of the course, practice, Beiing a good shot will put more animals in range, and will save frustrating searches for wounded game. Get instruction first, and far, far less practice will be neccesary, Often, the JFF is not strong here, but shooting instructors are quite abundant in this country. And nerding works far better in shooting than in hunting (where it frankly has absolutely no postive effect whatsoever) You can read up on anyting - but the same there, not the same people are good shooting instructors and good Youtube creators...

 

 

 

 

K

Edited by M67
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Thank you everyone for replies. I am based in Trondheim for couple of more years and then will move to Oslo.

 

I agree with practical training always having upper hand on reading books and that's what i am planning, to go target shooting very often and going to forest and learn some stalking and game calls. As mentioned it can be very difficult to get integrated in a hunting team and i have heard same from many people, so i am hoping to do either solo big game hunting or with another friend.

 

But all in all i am super excited for all time to come.

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